jeudi 17 août 2017

jquery event handling

Here is an example of basic event handling with JQUERY.. I know these days is probably not so relevant, but since there are still many legacy projects with jquery. All this from the linkedin learning center.



jQuery Event Handling


jeudi 26 janvier 2017

Code Reviews

learning from "Code Reviews"


How to implement a good code review policy that actually provides value to the software process? Should everyone do a code review? should only be limited to senior programmers?

start by defining who will make the code review; you want to give your programmers the ability to learn from each other  and to actually improve the code or to at least be compliant the standards in place.

lundi 18 juillet 2016

Programming opinions...

Here a copy of the list of 20 programming opinions from Programmer community Blog.

I pasted the ones I like the most but certainly the all deserve to be read.


1.

Programmers who don’t code in their spare time for fun will never become as good as those that do.

  I think even the smartest and most talented people will never become truly good programmers unless they treat it as more than a job. Meaning that they do little projects on the side, or just mess with lots of different languages and ideas in their spare time.
by rustyshelf


5.

“Googling it” is okay!

  Yes, I know it offends some people out there that their years of intense memorization and/or glorious stacks of programming books are starting to fall by the wayside to a resource that anyone can access within seconds, but you shouldn’t hold that against people that use it. Too often I hear googling answers to problems the result of criticism, and it really is without sense. First of all, it must be conceded that everyone needs materials to reference. You don’t know everything and you will need to look things up. Conceding that, does it really matter where you got the information? Does it matter if you looked it up in a book, looked it up on Google, or heard it from a talking frog that you hallucinated? No. A right answer is a right answer. What is important is that you understand the material, use it as the means to an end of a successful programming solution, and the client/your employer is happy with the results.
by PhoenixRedeemer

6.

Not all programmers are created equal.

  Quite often managers think that DeveloperA == DeveloperB simply because they have same level of experience and so on. In actual fact, the performance of one developer can be 10x or even 100x that of another. It’s politically risky to talk about it, but sometimes I feel like pointing out that, even though several team members may appear to be of equal skill, it’s not always the case. I have even seen cases where lead developers were ‘beyond hope’ and junior devs did all the actual work – I made sure they got the credit, though.
by Dmitri Nesteruk

17.

Software development is just a job.

 I enjoy software development a lot. I’ve written a blog for the last few years on the subject. I’ve spent enough time on here to have >5000 reputation points. And I work in a start-up doing typically 60 hour weeks for much less money than I could get as a contractor because the team is fantastic and the work is interesting. But in the grand scheme of things, it is just a job. It ranks in importance below many things such as family, my girlfriend, friends, happiness etc., and below other things I’d rather be doing if I had an unlimited supply of cash such as riding motorbikes, sailing yachts, or snowboarding. I think sometimes a lot of developers forget that developing is just something that allows us to have the more important things in life (and to have them by doing something we enjoy) rather than being the end goal in itself.
by Greg Beech




Programming opinions...

Here a copy of the list of 20 programming opinions from Programmer community Blog.

I pasted the ones I like the most but certainly the all deserve to be read.


1.

Programmers who don’t code in their spare time for fun will never become as good as those that do.

  I think even the smartest and most talented people will never become truly good programmers unless they treat it as more than a job. Meaning that they do little projects on the side, or just mess with lots of different languages and ideas in their spare time.
by rustyshelf


5.

“Googling it” is okay!

  Yes, I know it offends some people out there that their years of intense memorization and/or glorious stacks of programming books are starting to fall by the wayside to a resource that anyone can access within seconds, but you shouldn’t hold that against people that use it. Too often I hear googling answers to problems the result of criticism, and it really is without sense. First of all, it must be conceded that everyone needs materials to reference. You don’t know everything and you will need to look things up. Conceding that, does it really matter where you got the information? Does it matter if you looked it up in a book, looked it up on Google, or heard it from a talking frog that you hallucinated? No. A right answer is a right answer. What is important is that you understand the material, use it as the means to an end of a successful programming solution, and the client/your employer is happy with the results.
by PhoenixRedeemer

6.

Not all programmers are created equal.

  Quite often managers think that DeveloperA == DeveloperB simply because they have same level of experience and so on. In actual fact, the performance of one developer can be 10x or even 100x that of another. It’s politically risky to talk about it, but sometimes I feel like pointing out that, even though several team members may appear to be of equal skill, it’s not always the case. I have even seen cases where lead developers were ‘beyond hope’ and junior devs did all the actual work – I made sure they got the credit, though.
by Dmitri Nesteruk

17.

Software development is just a job.

 I enjoy software development a lot. I’ve written a blog for the last few years on the subject. I’ve spent enough time on here to have >5000 reputation points. And I work in a start-up doing typically 60 hour weeks for much less money than I could get as a contractor because the team is fantastic and the work is interesting. But in the grand scheme of things, it is just a job. It ranks in importance below many things such as family, my girlfriend, friends, happiness etc., and below other things I’d rather be doing if I had an unlimited supply of cash such as riding motorbikes, sailing yachts, or snowboarding. I think sometimes a lot of developers forget that developing is just something that allows us to have the more important things in life (and to have them by doing something we enjoy) rather than being the end goal in itself.
by Greg Beech




lundi 18 avril 2016

Developers' Seven Deadly Sins


In (mostly) no particular order, they are:

Bugs and Potential Bugs
Coding Standards Breach
Duplications
Lack of Unit Tests
Bad Distribution of Complexity
Spaghetti Design
Not Enough or Too Many Comments

taked from SonarQube.

lundi 8 février 2016

Quick Oracle tips v2 (2016)

Here a quick list of queries that may help you to gain sometime while checking for objects


1.  Getting the objects of the database:


Select  *  from DBA_OBJECTS where object_type like 'TABLE' AND owner like '%CAD'




2.  Setting the format for date types in oracle sql developer


Go to Tools> Preferences > Database > NLS and set the Date Format as MM/DD/YYYY HH24:MI:SS

jeudi 4 février 2016